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Revitalising the traditional song in Tunisia: Marketing strategies and the preservation of cultural identity
In Tunisia, there are numerous ways to revitalise traditional songs, from preserving the song's iden...

The traditional palm houses of Al-Ula Governorate
This study aims to highlight the roles played by historical and social factors and the residents&rsq...

The copper mortar in Sudanese folk beliefs and customs
The copper mortar is an old hand tool that the Sudanese imported from the Arab Republic of Egypt. Th...
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Issue 55
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Bahrain's national culture: Steady progress and enlightened thinking
Issue 55

This issue of the quarterly Folk Culture Journal is the second to be published in the Journal's fourteenth year. With steady progress and enlightened thinking, we have overcome technical and logistical obstacles and the fact that specialised journals have a limited number of readers, which usually prevents the continued publication of unique cultural journals in our Arab countries.

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Approaches to studying Sudanese culture The reality and theoretical ideology of Sudan
Issue 55

This paper discusses trends in Sudanese culture. It examines the contradiction between reality and the imagined backed by an ideology of supremacist authoritarianism that cancels and ignores the people of Sudan. It also examines four trends and attempts to understand and study Sudanese culture from the outside, which resulted in significant mistakes: (1) Pan-Arabism (2) Pan-Africanism (3) Afro-Arabism and (4) Diversity.

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The copper mortar in Sudanese folk beliefs and customs
Issue 55

The copper mortar is an old hand tool that the Sudanese imported from the Arab Republic of Egypt. The Egyptians used it for grinding or Harjalatak rituals. In the GCC countries, it is used for grinding saffron and other ingredients for perfumes. The paper relied on the historical, descriptive and analytical approaches and the collection of field data, which included oral narratives from the research community, interviews and observations, and a combination of the two methods.

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Folklore dance in Adrar (Tuat): The example of Qarqabu dance
Issue 55

Since ancient times, folk dance has been a way for the members of a society to express their desire to be free of life's worries, to vent their repressions and heal diseases, and to experience pride and joy. Folk dance, a popular activity and practice at celebrations, feasts and occasions, is preserved by teaching.

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Revitalising the traditional song in Tunisia: Marketing strategies and the preservation of cultural identity
Issue 55

In Tunisia, there are numerous ways to revitalise traditional songs, from preserving the song's identity to introducing partial or total change. However, the listener may not notice these changes; instead, they praise the performers for preserving musical heritage. This paper aims to shed light on traditional songs in order to increase awareness because the contemporary music industry promotes the artist at the expense of the song.

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Tales of folk beliefs in Tebessa, Algeria: The example of The Mulberry Tree
Issue 55

Folk literature is typically characterised as literature created by an individual whose identity is merged with that of the group to which he belongs in order to represent the group's concerns, hopes and sufferings in a fantastic literary style. Our paper examines the origins and historical roots of various doctrinal practices in the region studied while addressing the following...

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The impact of foreign music on Morocco's immaterial cultural heritage: The music and songs of Granada
Issue 55

Morocco has long been a rich melting pot of musical traditions with numerous cultural influences (Berber and Arab) from the Mediterranean region and Africa. It has always been a crossroads for the ancient civilisations that occupied the Mediterranean. It is estimated that there are more than fifty musical styles in Morocco based on factors such as the distinction between rural and urban areas, dialects or the environment, which includes plains, mountains, deserts and coasts. 

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The inspiring history of Sufism and unforgettable Sufi folk rituals in Morocco: The example of Issawi Sufism
Issue 55

On several levels, research into the history of Sufi rituals is crucial because it reveals that Sufism was not just an individual inclination towards asceticism, serious worship and solitude. It was a ritual practiced in corners and at shrines in order to recruit and train followers. This was accomplished through a variety of rituals such as annual gatherings, which are known as ‘Sufi seasons’ in Morocco, through frequent ‘dhikr’ circles held in the corners, or at other religious events celebrated by Moroccans and other Islamic peoples.

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The Kairouan carpet: Identity, authenticity, modernity and renewal
Issue 55

The traditional carpet (Zarbiyah) represents one of the most famous and authentic traditional industries in Tunisia. Zarbiyah is the singular form of the Quranic word Zaraabi, as mentioned in Surah Al Ghashiyah, "Faces, that Day, will show pleasure, with their effort [they are] satisfied. In an elevated garden, within it is a flowing spring. Within it are couches raised high. And cups put in place. And cushions lined up, and carpets (zaraabiyyu) spread around.”

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The olive tree in folk proverbs
Issue 55

Humans’ relationship with the olive tree was more than just a utilitarian one based on harvesting and squeezing its fruit for use in food, medicine and cosmetics. The olive tree acquired a spiritual and metaphorical significance, and the olive was revered by all peoples, civilisations and religions. Oral traditions and folk proverbs have immortalised the most beautiful imagery and the most amazing depictions of the olive tree in the collective memory. The subject of this study is the olive tree in folk proverbs in Tunisia and on the island of Djerba in particular.

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