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The History of Jewellery in Islam
The jewellery industry has grown since ancient times. Some jewellery was made of bone and stones but...

Symbols in southern Tunisian textiles and their denotations
In this paper, we highlight the most important features of symbols found in various traditional wove...

Prayer beads (Masbaha): From the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul to Al Shuq Palace in Cairo
People use prayer beads to keep count while they recite the Tasbih prayer. The beads are made of nat...
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Issue 33
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With respect and gratitude for the Egyptian school of folk art ..
Issue 33

In 1932, delegations from most Arab countries and European scholars, musicians and historians attended the First Music Conference at the Institute of Arab Music in Cairo.

This historic conference made people aware of the value of Arab folklore. The famous writer Tawfiq Al Hakim stressed the importance of oral heritage, and emphasised the need to protect it. The main aim of this conference was to enhance the role of music and to preserve the heritage of Arab music, especially after the death of great pioneers such as Minyalawi, Saleh Abdul Hai and Sayed Darwish.

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Taghribat Bani Hilal: From word of mouth to the theatre
Issue 33

In his PhD dissertation on the history of the Bani Hilal, Dr. Abdul Hamid Yunus, a professor of Folk Literature at Cairo University, said that Ibn Khuldun’s book ‘Muqaddimah’ was the first reliable source of information about the Bani Hilal’s history and significant events. Ibn Khuldun wanted to recognise the people who survived Bani Hilal’s migration to North Africa.

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Graves and mausoleums of pious men (Awliyaa) in Morocco
Issue 33

In Morocco, there are many graves and mausoleums of pious men (Awliyaa), and some Moroccan families visit these graves in search of solutions for mental disorders or social problems.

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Research into the problem of elite culture and folk culture: Teaching folk culture in Morocco
Issue 33

Before discussing the issue of folk culture and its relationship with the culture of the elite in Morocco, we must talk about the Western understanding and experience of addressing the same issues, because foreign researchers were the first to highlight the importance of folk culture.

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Myths and folktales about sea creatures in Bahrain
Issue 33

Mythical creatures, mythological animals and mythical beings are widely spread concepts. They can be found in all known cultures, and each culture has at least one specific mythical creature. Every culture includes people who do not believe in the existence of these mythical creatures, but there are always others who believe in their existence, especially since myths have become part of the collective folk memory.

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Symbols in southern Tunisian textiles and their denotations
Issue 33

In this paper, we highlight the most important features of symbols found in various traditional woven fabrics in southern Tunisia’s cities and towns, and attempt to interpret their local and global denotations and to determine the extent of their influence on other civilisations.

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Prayer beads (Masbaha): From the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul to Al Shuq Palace in Cairo
Issue 33

People use prayer beads to keep count while they recite the Tasbih prayer. The beads are made of natural materials such as stones, wood, metal or bone, or of artificial materials.  

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A view of folk poet Sidi Al Akhdar ibn Khalluf
Issue 33

Sidi Al Akhdar ibn Khalluf is a renowned folk poet in North Africa, especially Algeria. He left a huge legacy, most of which is still in the form of manuscripts stored in cupboards and in bags on shelves and in drawers. It is possible that much of his legacy has been lost due to negligence...

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Sawt music in the Arabian Gulf and Tunisia
Issue 33

We were inspired to write about Sawt after reading numerous studies about this ancient musical form.

In this paper, I focus on Sawt in Tunisia and in the Arabian Gulf, specifically Bahrain, Kuwait and Yemen. These two regions have commonalities although they are thousands of kilometres apart. I drew on different studies, and conducted a descriptive analytical field study similar to Poul Rovsing Olsen’s study in Bahrain.

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Rababah singers in Upper Mesopotamia
Issue 33

This paper presents the first classification of past and present rababah singers in Upper Mesopotamia. After an arduous yearlong field study, I was able to classify singers of rababah in Upper Mesopotamia, located within Iraq, Syria and Turkey.

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