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Folk traditions and how they reflect social and cultural characteristics: The example of Laghouat city
Natural conditions in our communities, particularly in the desert, have helped to unleash the imagin...

Biography: Method and techniques
This paper deals with the biography method, which is considered one of the most important methodolog...

Arab women’s attire: Social traditions and cultural interaction
One cannot study women’s attire without investigating the relationship between society and rel...
Issue 29
A dire need
Issue 29

In over 30 years of hard work, the International Organization of Folk Art (IOV) has managed to establish a presence in 161 countries. Members run local branches that coordinate with global efforts, making IOV an organisation that protects folk art and folk culture around the world.

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Biography: Method and techniques
Issue 29

This paper deals with the biography method, which is considered one of the most important methodologies in the humanities. Biography’s cognitive approach aims to monitor the intellectual dynamism in the areas of sociology and anthropology; it also aims to demonstrate the richness of Western scientific legacy, which led to the active dynamism of these writing approaches more than a century ago. Every day, researchers discover the depth and richness of biography’s indicators and cognitive implications in all scientific fields. 

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Folk traditions and how they reflect social and cultural characteristics: The example of Laghouat city
Issue 29

Natural conditions in our communities, particularly in the desert, have helped to unleash the imagination and shape the beliefs that are part of folk culture in North African communities. These communities are unique in that oral culture is more prevalent than written culture.

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Misdar and Mawwal
Issue 29

Poets recite the Misdar as they ride camels through the desert, while the Nahham, (pearl diving singer), and his companions at sea sing the Mawwal. Both are poems in form and composition and, in both cases, the poet expresses the anguish and agony of leaving. The Nahham leaves his home, parents, children and beloved, while the Misdar’s poet leaves his home in search of another kind of pearl - his beloved. Both poets speak of leaving the familiar and of their desire to reach their goals. 

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Arab women’s attire: Social traditions and cultural interaction
Issue 29

One cannot study women’s attire without investigating the relationship between society and religion. Society comprises customs and traditions that are expressed in multiple ways in everyday behaviour. Religion includes guidelines about various types of attire within the framework of changes related to time and place; women should follow the obligatory Islamic dress code by covering their heads and bodies and showing only their faces and hands. Some women go even further and cover their faces and their entire bodies. This is an unchanging part of Islamic teachings.

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Abundance and scarcity: An anthropological approach
Issue 29

Food varies according to people, culture and environment. French anthropologist Lévi-Strauss created a food triangle, classifying food as raw, cooked or rotten. His Culinary Triangle is an important reference.

His Triangle made it possible to understand the phenomenon of food and its position in communities’ daily lives. This study offers us the opportunity to familiarise ourselves with the Humama tribe and features of its culture, most of which have disappeared because of the homogenising effects of globalization.

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Seductive dance: Where it originated and where it is performed
Issue 29

Awalim’ (seductive dancers) perform at ceremonies and weddings held by all social classes, whether at a five-star hotel or in a side street. There was great demand for this form of expressive dance from the second half of the nineteenth century until the mid-twentieth century.

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Traditional Moroccan weaving: Women’s culture 
Issue 29

In the social fabric of the Ait and Rayin tribes in Morocco, a woman’s status is based on her experience and her social role. At the economic level, she plays an important role by helping her husband with income-generating crafts and trades. She works in the fields, easing the burden on her husband, the main breadwinner. In these tribes, weaving and knitting are among women’s most prominent income-generating activities, driven by necessity. Women used to combine textile making with other everyday tasks such as parenting, breeding livestock and preparing meals; they usually weaved or knitted in their free time.

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Traditional Qusbahs from the Middle Ages in southeastern Tunisia: The ruins of Jebel Dummar and the Qusbahs’ role in drawing people to the Sahara desert
Issue 29

In southeastern Tunisia, ruins from the Middle Ages prove that there were once towns and a significant population in this area. Terraces ring the hills; these served as fortresses with towers for surveillance. They then evolved into palaces and areas that were equipped to store crops for at least five years.

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Traditional trades and crafts in the Moroccan city of Taza during the French occupation: The unchanging and the changed 
Issue 29

Craftsmen and artisans generated trade and attracted inhabitants to urban regions in Morocco and throughout the Islamic and Arab world. Craftsmen and artisans made up a significant proportion of the population in Moroccan cities, and they made important contributions, second only to agriculture, to the country’s economy by generating trade and taxes.

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