Language Issue

Read in this Issue

Authenticating clay architectural heritage in the south
Architectural heritage is one component of a society’s identity, and it reflects the society&r...

An anthropological study of authority in traditional societies: The Al-Sulh Group in Djelfa Province
One of the most distinctive features of the Djelfa region in central Algeria is what is known as the...

Traditional children's games in Tunisia: An ethnographic and anthropological study
This study concludes that it is important to document and classify Tunisian children's games accordi...
38
Issue 38
You can download the issue (PDF) from this link
Folk Heritage: Illegal Exploitation
Issue 38

I had the opportunity to attend the 7th UNESCO NGO Forum on May 3-5, and I learned about the experiences of the international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) affiliated with UNESCO.
Representatives of over 350 organisations attended the Forum. It was evident that most of the world’s countries are keen to preserve and protect tangible and intangible folk heritage. A great deal of consideration was given to attempts to make valuable cultural heritage into a commercial commodity for illicit material gain.

Read More
The Rebab
Issue 38

Several sources agree that the Rebab, an instrument used to play nostalgic music, spread from the Arabian Peninsula to other areas of the world. The Western historian Henry George Farmer said that a branch of the Salim Tribe of Yemen took the Rebab across the Red Sea to rural areas of Egypt during the second century after Prophet Muhammad’s (PBUH) migration.

Read More
The Hilali Epic and the public: A study of forms of audience response
Issue 38

Folk discourse is characterised by the audience’s direct response during oral performances. Due to its flexible nature, folk discourse allows for additions and deletions whenever it is performed, so every performance yields a new narration co-authored by the narrator and the audience.

Read More
Standardised features of intangible cultural heritage
Issue 38

Standardisation is an institutional activity carried out by specialised organisations that are recognised internationally, such as ISO, regionally, such as the European Union, or nationally, such as the Moroccan Standards Institute.

Read More
An anthropological study of authority in traditional societies: The Al-Sulh Group in Djelfa Province
Issue 38

One of the most distinctive features of the Djelfa region in central Algeria is what is known as the conciliation group or community, a type of traditional judiciary that has been passed down through the generations. The group, through its members or mediators, has long been responsible for the security and preservation of Djelfa's community and distinctive tribal identity.

Read More
Authenticating clay architectural heritage in the south
Issue 38

Architectural heritage is one component of a society’s identity, and it reflects the society’s customs and traditions. It demonstrates humans’ ability to adapt to their environment, so it is of great value and interest to tourists and local and foreign investors.

Read More
Traditional children's games in Tunisia: An ethnographic and anthropological study
Issue 38

This study concludes that it is important to document and classify Tunisian children's games according to multiple variables, including place, time, area, age, gender, number of participants, tools, and rules. The study also involved analysing each variable individually to arrive at useful findings.

Read More
Phenomenology in Amazigh culture in A Vava Inouva lyrics by Idir
Issue 38

From the high mountains of Jarjarah, the plateaus of Sétif and the Biskra valley to the rocky mountains of Tasli, which are inhabited by the blue people known as the Touareg, there are vibrant villages and groups of people who live close to nature. These Amazigh villages, (in Algeria, the people are known as ‘Al Qaba’el’), have a strong relationship with nature, one which has been enhanced over time.

Read More
Tangible culture and its role in economic and social development
Issue 38

Museums should teach citizens about the social and economic realities of their environment. This includes exposing people to knowledge unavailable at other official institutions. In Africa, museums are places where knowledge about the country's history and its contemporary culture is exchanged. This makes knowledge available to everyone. The museum plays a fundamental role by explaining history and its events, and showcasing the creativity of its people.

Read More